Women’s Strength Training at Burnaby Gym Can Lead to Effective Weight Loss

Last March, Rich Barlow of BU Today reported on the survey findings conducted by Boston University's College of Arts and Sciences psychology instructor Andrea Mercutio and coed Dominique Cheung. The duo asked at least 1,000 Boston women on their views on weight lifting. Based on the poll, younger women who go to all-female gyms are more open to weight lifting than those who go to co-ed gyms, but in general, women were reluctant to lift weights for fear of appearing too manly or muscular. Barlow shared the story of Sarah Kuranda, who attests to the benefits of weight lifting and says that she has become “leaner and stronger” as a result of an exercise regimen that includes strength training. Burnaby locals can follow Kuranda's example and incorporate strength training into their workouts. To ensure optimum results, they can sign up for membership at a dependable gym in Burnaby like She's Fit! that offers an all-around workout program inclusive of cardio and strength exercises. Barlow mentioned that only 17.5 percent of women respondents meet the aerobic and strength training recommendations put forward by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Aerobic programs include activities such as jogging and biking, something that Burnaby locals can easily do since the city has a lot of great biking trails in areas like Deer Lake Park. Meanwhile, women who prefer exercising in closely supervised indoor settings can join an all-female health club in Burnaby such as She's Fit. Kuranda admits that while she gained weight as a

Trusting Fitness Experts to Design Rational Diets for Weight Reduction

Kerry Grens of Reuters reported back in June about the results of a study conducted by Dr. Kari Johansson and her team at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. The study revealed that quick weight loss related to extreme caloric restriction can dramatically impact the salt and cholesterol composition of bile as well as the functions of the gallbladder. These scenarios can ultimately lead to gallstones. Half of the 6,640 dieters who participated in the study went on crash diets, while the other half went on low-calorie diets. Crash diets are characterized by severely restricted caloric intake; while low-calorie diets consist of smaller portions of calorie-rich foods. To steer clear of possible health risks, dieters and weight-watchers may want to sign up at a reputable Chilliwack gym that offers a personalized nutrition diet plan which prioritizes one's health over rapid weight loss. In Dr. Johansson's study, the crash dieters consumed liquid meals amounting to 500 calories per day. This weight loss plan lasted anywhere from 6 to 10 weeks, followed by a nine-month weight maintenance program that included exercise and healthy eating. Since most maintenance weight programs are designed for the general population, someone who is seriously striving to lose weight is likely to achieve better results with a personalized program offered at trusted fitness centers like She's Fit! Meanwhile, Grens reported that while the crash dieters lost at least 30 pounds within the first three months of the program, 48 of them ultimately developed gallstones. Interestingly, the group of dieters who went on

Seeing Through the Trappings: How A Reputable Surrey Gym Can Help You Avoid the Health Halo Phenomenon

A recent study reveals that the “health halo” eating phenomenon manifests itself when one eats unhealthy food items topped with what are perceived to be wholesome ingredients, believing then that the food item has become healthy. As reported by Misty Harris in Canada.com, a study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology found that people tend to underestimate the calorie content of foods with an unhealthy base, such as cake or ice cream, when paired with something healthy such as fruits or low-fat substitutes. The term “health halo” refers to the positive bias people generally have toward unhealthy food when it is presented to have one or more healthy attributes. Experts believe the tendency to sanctify unhealthy food this way is unconscious, as diners who eat this food actually believing it has become healthy. Anyone can, therefore, fall victim to this phenomenon, something which may be avoided through a lifestyle dedicated to fitness. Admittedly, it is not easy to commit to such a lifestyle, but an institution as accessible as a reputable Surrey gym can offer all the support you may need to achieve these goals. Health halo food traps can come in many guises. In her report, Ms. Harris cites other studies demonstrating this phenomenon, such as one where the research volunteers consumed larger quantities of low-fat M&M's than regular M&M's, believing the former was healthier. Another study found that people who frequented sandwich chains as opposed to fast food chains are likely to order more drinks and desserts when they

Working Out at a North Vancouver Gym Today? Watch What you Eat After

Have you ever noticed that despite working out for several hours a week at a North Vancouver gym, for example, you're still a couple of kilos overweight? Perhaps the problem has less to do with the duration or intensity of your workouts than with the type of food you eat afterward. According to a Huffington Post UK article, many people either reward themselves with the wrong kinds of food or underestimate the number of calories they consume. Weight loss expert Dr Khandee Ahnaimugan says that while you might burn 300 calories after a 3-mile run, it will all be in vain if you drink a large latte with 350 calories. You therefore need to strike the right balance between nutrition and exercise if you truly want to lose weight. By creating a calorie deficit, i.e., consuming fewer calories than your body needs, you can shed off those excess pounds and bust cellulite. For instance, if you want to reward yourself with a pizza, then you need to spend an extra hour on the spin cycle simply to cancel out the calories. As disclosed by the Daily Mail and Critical Bench, one Big Mac (560 calories) requires fifty minutes of running; a 201-calorie serving of ice cream may set you back by eighteen minutes of running; and a single piece of Godiva chocolate (110 calories) calls for ten minutes of running. To maximize weight loss, why not approach a fitness coach at gyms like She's Fit! who can create a custom meal plan

Women’s Strength Training at Burnaby Gym Can Lead to Effective Weight Loss

Last March, Rich Barlow of BU Today reported on the survey findings conducted by Boston University's College of Arts and Sciences psychology instructor Andrea Mercutio and coed Dominique Cheung. The duo asked at least 1,000 Boston women on their views on weight lifting. Based on the poll, younger women who go to all-female gyms are more open to weight lifting than those who go to co-ed gyms, but in general, women were reluctant to lift weights for fear of appearing too manly or muscular. Barlow shared the story of Sarah Kuranda, who attests to the benefits of weight lifting and says that she has become “leaner and stronger” as a result of an exercise regimen that includes strength training. Burnaby locals can follow Kuranda's example and incorporate strength training into their workouts. To ensure optimum results, they can sign up for membership at a dependable gym in Burnaby like She's Fit! that offers an all-around workout program inclusive of cardio and strength exercises. Barlow mentioned that only 17.5 percent of women respondents meet the aerobic and strength training recommendations put forward by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Aerobic programs include activities such as jogging and biking, something that Burnaby locals can easily do since the city has a lot of great biking trails in areas like Deer Lake Park. Meanwhile, women who prefer exercising in closely supervised indoor settings can join an all-female health club in Burnaby such as She's Fit. Kuranda admits that while she gained weight as a

Hit a Well-equipped Chilliwack Gym, Watch What You Eat, and See Those Pounds Melt Away

Kerry Grens of Reuters reported back in June about the results of a study conducted by Dr. Kari Johansson and her team at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. The study revealed that quick weight loss related to extreme caloric restriction can dramatically impact the salt and cholesterol composition of bile as well as the functions of the gallbladder. These scenarios can ultimately lead to gallstones. Half of the 6,640 dieters who participated in the study went on crash diets, while the other half went on low-calorie diets. Crash diets are characterized by severely restricted caloric intake; while low-calorie diets consist of smaller portions of calorie-rich foods. To steer clear of possible health risks, dieters and weight-watchers may want to sign up at a reputable Chilliwack gym that offers a personalized nutrition diet plan which prioritizes one's health over rapid weight loss. In Dr. Johansson's study, the crash dieters consumed liquid meals amounting to 500 calories per day. This weight loss plan lasted anywhere from 6 to 10 weeks, followed by a nine-month weight maintenance program that included exercise and healthy eating. Since most maintenance weight programs are designed for the general population, someone who is seriously striving to lose weight is likely to achieve better results with a personalized program offered at trusted fitness centers like She's Fit! Meanwhile, Grens reported that while the crash dieters lost at least 30 pounds within the first three months of the program, 48 of them ultimately developed gallstones. Interestingly, the group of dieters who went on

Seeing Through the Trappings: How A Reputable Surrey Gym Can Help You Avoid the Health Halo Phenomenon

A recent study reveals that the “health halo” eating phenomenon manifests itself when one eats unhealthy food items topped with what are perceived to be wholesome ingredients, believing then that the food item has become healthy. As reported by Misty Harris in Canada.com, a study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology found that people tend to underestimate the calorie content of foods with an unhealthy base, such as cake or ice cream, when paired with something healthy such as fruits or low-fat substitutes. The term “health halo” refers to the positive bias people generally have toward unhealthy food when it is presented to have one or more healthy attributes. Experts believe the tendency to sanctify unhealthy food this way is unconscious, as diners who eat this food actually believing it has become healthy. Anyone can, therefore, fall victim to this phenomenon, something which may be avoided through a lifestyle dedicated to fitness. Admittedly, it is not easy to commit to such a lifestyle, but an institution as accessible as a reputable Surrey gym can offer all the support you may need to achieve these goals. Health halo food traps can come in many guises. In her report, Ms. Harris cites other studies demonstrating this phenomenon, such as one where the research volunteers consumed larger quantities of low-fat M&M's than regular M&M's, believing the former was healthier. Another study found that people who frequented sandwich chains as opposed to fast food chains are likely to order more drinks and desserts when they